ATL’s New Theme Song

Brand Atlanta and Dallas Austin unveiled Atlanta’s new theme song last night during the Falcon’s half time show.

So come on… what did you think?

(Listen to a clip here)

68 Comments so far

  1. EUSTexas (unregistered) on November 14th, 2005 @ 3:33 pm

    All kidding aside, it will be interesting to see just how many street people and crack whores are attracted to relocate to The ATL after hearing this song.

    And maybe even attract a lot of newbies from SFO and Key West when they see the flaming sphincter logo.


  2. southerngirl (unregistered) on November 14th, 2005 @ 10:14 pm

    The song is just as tasteless as those that “sing” it.


  3. FormerAtlantan (unregistered) on November 15th, 2005 @ 7:53 pm

    Just glad to be a ‘former’ Atlantan…


  4. Native Atlantan who's glad she left! (unregistered) on November 16th, 2005 @ 4:07 pm

    There are a 2 million things I could say here. And each would represent where a dollar would have been better spent in Atlanta. The infrastructure is failing, the metro area is nearing perpetual gridlock, litter is everywhere and tax dollars are poorly spent. The song is as vacuous as the place I’m embarrassed to call my hometown. Thus I suppose the song fits.


  5. CM (unregistered) on November 17th, 2005 @ 11:19 am

    NPR did a story on the song a few days ago. So now the entire nation knows. *sigh*

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5012383


  6. Nichole (unregistered) on November 18th, 2005 @ 9:48 pm

    I never thought “Georgia on my mind” needed to be changed. When I hear that song I get goose bumps and it helps me remember why I love living in Georgia. BUT WHEN I HEARD THIS PIECE OF SHIT SONG, IT SERIOUSLY MADE ME ASHAMED TO BE APART OF A CITY THAT WOULD WASTE TAX PAYERS’ MONEY. INSTEAD OF REPAIRING THE ROADS OR CLEANING UP THE STREETS THEY PAY SOME UNTALENTED PEOPLE TO SCREAM SOME ATL SHIT INTO A MIC. THIS SONG SOUNDS LIKE A LAME THEME SONG FOR SOME AWFUL 90’S SHOWS ON DAY TIME T.V.


  7. mac (unregistered) on November 19th, 2005 @ 12:32 pm

    i was unable to have sex for 5 days after hearing this song… its like the opposite of viagra..


  8. The South's OK (unregistered) on December 5th, 2005 @ 5:43 pm

    Well, the song is bad … I can definitely see the city making better use of the funds than being spent on this marketing ploy. I think a refund should be in order. But, it would be nice for the ATL to have a theme-song or catchy phrase like other metro areas in the country. Ray Charles’ song is about the state not the city, and unquestionably a great song. I can’t say that I agree with letting this song be the anthem for the city, but a better production from the likes of Dallas or however is needed!!

    To comment on the person from L.A., I don’t think that there’s anything wrong with the “Black Mecca” label for the ATL within the African-American community. The fact that people in other parts of the country choose to be so ignorant of the South in general (let alone Atlanta) is more distrubing than what the black community feels or expresses post-Katrina. The city may “see only race” but everywhere in this country is like that … even NYC and other place. Whether or not one chooses to see or acknowledge the racial issues/tensions is another discussion. I lived in the NYC for 3 years, and have observed a lot. Just because people don’t openly say racist things in NYC or LA doesn’t mean that they are discrimination-free. Gentrification is a serious issue in NYC. Columbia University is located in Harlem, but a lot has been done to curtail the message that it exists in some location called Morningside Heights. And for those that don’t know, it’s still Harlem, for Harlem runs form 110th to about 150-155th (to be true, Harlem has always been from 95th but the powers that be don’t like to make that fact known).

    I don’t see how the black community in California allowed ‘Prop 209’ to pass, but that’s another issue entirely. But everywhere has both its pluses and minuses. I only bring it up because, like the discussions of “diversity” so many people believe we live in an open society. The easiest ways to deal with a problem is to downplay it, ignore it, say that it’s no long an issue, or simply hope that it goes away.

    The Tuskgee Experiment ran for 40 years, from 1932-1972. The backers of this vile program were the US Surgeon General, the CDC, and the US Public Health Service to name a few gov’t agencies. Around 400 black men were deprived of treatment, 130 died with 40 wives and 19 children born would experience the same fate. I bring up all this to say that the outrage about Katrina and whether our gov’t has the capacity to deny action to Katrina based on race is nothing more than a reflection of the reality in America. The gov’t has acted openly in the very recent past to discriminate in such a way that ‘Black Rage’ has a very plausible base in which to express itself publicly. Katrina only lifted the facade of the very real race and class issues that exist in this country. Just like the events in Paris, the rest of Europe is poised for a similar fate. So to does America if it wishes to continue in a fairy-tale existence.


  9. Moron's (unregistered) on December 7th, 2005 @ 11:53 pm

    I think all of you are morons. To the person above me who wrote about the Paris incidents…..don’t you know it started because two teenagers (arab and african descent I believe) were running from police (WHY WOULD SOMEONE DO THAT???) and hid in some warehouse (can’t remember where) and accidentely got electrocuted on their own behalf? Sure, it started long before that but this incident sparked the riots so they were only looking for something to light the fire. Please do your research before speaking. Let’s talk about Atlanta how it really is. We are a transit city. Most of the people in Atlanta are RACIST. Not just whites, but blacks are racist as well as everyone else. The reason a lot of people have a problem with the song is because it was written by blacks, for blacks and to attract blacks. Plain and simple. If it were the other way around there would be the same outcry from the other side. Why does DIVERSE mean “less whites.” I would rather have a bunch of purple colored educated freaks running around than a bunch of ignorant whites, blacks, you name an ethnicity, running around my streets spreading their ignorance. Diverse means you are WELL-ROUNDED and by the looks of it, Atlanta needs to implement the buddy system with someone NOT LIKE YOU. You want more blacks here? Fine, but don’t package it as a theme song for EVERYONE and act surprised when someone calls your bluff. It reminds me of what Sandy Springs did a few months ago about making their own “city legislature” and it was just a curtain over the real issue that they didn’t want lower income families moving in left and right. I know, because I lived there. This shouldn’t even be a racial issue at all. And to all you blacks out there believing that we whites are SOooo RACIST, look at yourselves and see if maybe the problem here is that you can’t let go either. I am not attacking one side, I could honestly care less about the song, I think it sucks on every level. I am just pointing out how everytime someone criticizes what another ethinicity group does no one hears what they are saying and AUTOMATICALLY assumes it is some racial attack. This is where you guys are MORONS. Education can help you guys with that but since Georgia doesn’t really believe in higher education I guess we’ll just have to rely on our “Urban Music” to inform us about world events and the english language. In case you don’t understand, I am referencing all you out there that vote against using lottery money to put your children in school and use it elsewhere. Because what we really need to focus on is our childrens street smarts to get him that HIGH PAYING JOB all these loser kids have these days. But “omellete” you slide this time. So quit complaining and using the victim routine, all of you, if we quit using this race card everywhere maybe we wouldn’t be so scared of eachother. So please put down your pitchforks and crosses, lower your knives and guns, and do what NORMAL PEOPLE do when they don’t like something, SUE ME.


  10. jasmine jackson (unregistered) on December 13th, 2005 @ 11:55 am

    I think the new anthem is very hot.forget all of yall haterz, all yall is just mad because yall didnt think of it yall selves. and thats whatz hot in the streetz!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ATL 4 LIFE !!!!!!!!!!!!!404 404 404


  11. The South's OK (unregistered) on December 13th, 2005 @ 3:47 pm

    To the person with the name “MORON”, I have done my homework. Sure the incident concerning the two youth provided the light to the powder keg. BUT THE CORE ISSUES STILL REMAIN …

    If you’ve ever been to Europe, you will have witnessed all kinds of discrimination, especially race, similar to the U.S. Many African-Americans that move there are blinded by the incidents that go on around them. The same goes for those that are visitors. As a black AMERICAN, that blue passport gives you untold power and influence. People do not treat you the same as Africans or other African-descedant groups. In fact, ANY AMERICAN is treated better and on par with native, indigenous European groups, which is far better than what other racial/ethnic group receive in Europe. Spain has its issues with North Africans and Arabs. What has occurred in Paris is indicative of things to come in Europe if they don’t deal with their issues of integration, racial/ethnic disrimination, class, fair play, nationalism, and acceptance. So, please do YOUR homework or at least be more observant in your travels.


  12. LaJuana (unregistered) on December 13th, 2005 @ 6:25 pm

    To the person from LA-
    I am origionally from Atlanta and currently live in LA. I hate it here and can’t wait to get beck home in two months. I must disagree with you, because LA is the most racially segregated place I have ever been, and I have traveled to many places. It is also a very dirty city unless you are in the expensive white areas. I was born and raised in Atlanta(actually in Fayetteville) and I came 3000 miles to be called the N-word by a white old man. I was in complete shock.

    I am sorry the only thing that LA can offer African Americans in the sandy beaches, and they are pouluted. You are correct with your theory that the african americans in Atlanta refer to it as the Black Mecca. It is one of the few cities in which the Aferican Americans have arrived. It took me to leave Atlanta to appreciate where I came come and to really embrace my herritage. I was outrages as to how many people didn’t know who Hosea Williams was out here. During Black history month every child is doing book reports on Martin Luther King, Malclm X or Rosa Parks. They don’t know about the others who fought for our rights like Abernathy, Andrew young, ect. Here they have not been taught about that. Everyone here is a transplant from the south and they come here and want to forget.

    Maybe that is what you like/miss about LA. I have found that people here just sweep the issues that affect the african american community under the rug. For example affermitive action, I couldn’t believe that the African Americans didn’t go out and vote for this issue.

    Yea….. I like the song as I stated above, becasue it represents me and my feeling about Atlanta and I love it.


  13. KatrinaSurvivor (unregistered) on December 19th, 2005 @ 12:43 pm

    In response to “The South’s OK” mention of Katrina. The South’s OK wrote:
    “I bring up all this to say that the outrage about Katrina and whether our gov’t has the capacity to deny action to Katrina based on race is nothing more than a reflection of the reality in America. The gov’t has acted openly in the very recent past to discriminate in such a way that ‘Black Rage’ has a very plausible base in which to express itself publicly. Katrina only lifted the facade of the very real race and class issues that exist in this country.”

    I would have to disagree with that statement. I am here. I have educated myself to the reality, and would like to open your eyes to it. Know why you saw mostly African American’s at the Super Dome suffering? Because according to the 2000 Census, there are 66.6% of the population of Orleans Parish which is African American. 26% is Caucasian. The other 7.4% are Asian, Hispanic, and “other”.

    You want to know the truth as to why so few left and were stranded? “poverty” and “race” had nothing to do with it. So many stayed behind, because every year, we evacuate, over and over and over, only to have to spend money on a motel or hotel, food, and gas– just for near misses of hurricanes. So after many years of that, everyone, of all races, decided they would ride it out, since it will probably jump at the last minute, at least far enough away from us to give us bad winds but not much else. We had become complacent. False alarm after false alarm made many, many, MANY stay. I evacuated, only hours before it hit, and only because someone lent me a little bit of money for gas for my car. I planned on staying due to financial problems (I am a poor university student, who lives more than 4000 dollars a year below the poverty level).

    Further, you have extreme ammounts of housing in and around the downtown New Orleans area and surrounding areas– You have tens of thousands who live close enough to the big areas to not need a vehicle (and why pay insurance and gas costs when you do not need a car, because your work, your shopping, your everything is within walking distance?)

    As for a 60 Minute report that was shown on national TV explaining how Gretna police would not let people into Gretna who were crossing the Crescent City Connection bridge– A few tourists, and African American’s were on the 60 Minutes program saying it was because they were black. That is not true, and 60 Minutes knew that before they aired their show. They are using the race issue to get ratings.

    The REAL story is this:
    The Parish in which Gretna is located (Parish is the equivalent to county in other states but down here we call them Parishes) was under Marshal Law with STRICT DECLARATION that NOBODY IN AND NOBODY OUT! Race had NOTHING to do with it, but 60 Minutes is working hard to turn it into a racial issue so they can fuel hatred and biggotry in this country.

    For those who do not know, Martial Law is:
    “the system of rules that takes effect (usually after a formal declaration) when a military authority takes control of the normal administration of justice (and usually of the whole state).

    Martial law is instituted most often when it becomes necessary to favour the activity of military authorities and organizations, usually for urgent unforeseen needs, and when the normal institutions of justice either cannot function or could be deemed too slow or too weak for the new situation, i.e., due to war or civil disorder, in occupied territory, or after a coup d’√ątat. The need to preserve the public order during an emergency is the essential goal of martial law. However, declaration of martial law is also sometimes used by dictatorships, especially military dictatorships, to enforce their rule.

    Usually martial law reduces some of the personal rights ordinarily granted to the citizen, limits the length of the trial processes, and prescribes more severe penalties than ordinary law. In many countries martial law prescribes the death penalty for certain crimes, even if ordinary law doesn’t contain that crime or punishment in its system.

    In many countries martial law imposes particular rules, one of which is curfew.”
    (ref: http://www.reference.com/browse/wiki/Martial_law)

    Now, the reason Martial Law was enacted, and enforced with a “Nobody in and nobody out” policy, is because Gretna, along with a small unincorporated area that I live in, is in Jefferson Parish- right literally outside of downtown New Orleans.

    Our Parish President enacted Marshal Law, because like Orleans Parish (where New Orleans is located), our parish suffered great flooding, and alot of wind damage due to Hurricane Katrina. In MANY parts of our parish it was not equipted to handle thousands of people fleeing New Orleans. Now, I live right off of the I-10 and within a five minute walk from my townhouse they had a staging area for buses to evacuate New Orleans evacuees, who made it into our Parish. We had entire neighborhoods looted (including our neighborhood- two buildings down from ours, looters broke through windows and doors to loot) but due to all emergency personel working in our area to get people to safety, they did not have the manpower to host tens of thousands who wanted to cross that bridge.

    So NOBODY IN and NOBODY OUT became the rule. The color of skin had NOTHING to do with it. Nothing at all to do with it.

    I am sick and tired of the media making this into a race issue. The Lower 9th ward (which was worst hit with flooding and right where the levees broke) were predominantly poverty strickened areas. In Orleans Parish, according to the census in the year 2000, 66.6% of Orleans Parish residents who did the census were African American and 26.6% are Caucasian. That does not include the Asians, Hispanics, and other races. (ref: http://www.gnocdc.org/) And many lived close enough to the city that they had no vehicles (who needs it when you live within walking distance of one of the largest cities in the country??). Due to the fact that 66.6% of the population were African American, of course there were going to be more African American’s on the bridge wanting to cross. Their skin color was not why they were turned away though. It was because the orders were given, under Marshal Law, to not let ANYONE in or ANYONE out of Jefferson Parish, which is where that bridge led.

    My point in posting is this:
    Does racism exist? Sure it does. But what is being done about it? How often after a person is discriminated against do they do something to stop it? Sue a person? Contact authorities? Contact a boss or supervisor of the person who discriminated? Rarely.

    If a person is tired of being “held down” do something about it- get a good education and make changes- it worked for Martin Luther King Jr. He didnt just say “our people are being held down, lets stand around and complain about it to each other and not do anything about it”. Rather he said “You don’t like how our race is being treated? EDUCATE yourselves, and show them why their perceptions are wrong!! Educate yourself and get the good jobs which will help you make change for your people!!”

    If people followed the philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr. then there would be no racism, because remember- He had a dream. And he told us his dream so we could know what needs to be done. He didn’t just tell us for us to say “oh he had a dream”. He gave the African American race a blue print of what needed to be done to live in a color blind society. How many people have followed in his footsteps? Not many. Unfortunate.

    Anyway back to the point:
    Katrina.
    Katrina hit a predominantly African American city. Of course there are going to be many more African Americans suffering because of it.

    I lost my entire downstairs and everything in it. I am not qualified for FEMA assistance (long story but FEMA screwed me over by getting my application wrong). I still, almost 4 months later, STILL have no downstairs due to my landlord not having insurance and not being able to afford to get things done. I have no kitchen. I have no kitchen sink. I have no livingroom. Everything in my downstairs destroyed. Gone..

    IT IS MY OWN FAULT!! I could not afford renters insurance. The failure to evacuate people LIES SOLY ON THE SHOULDERS OF THE INDIVIDUALS THEMSELVES who did not feel they should evacuate. The superdome turned into a mess. Every hurricane they end up opening up the superdome as a “shelter of last resorts”. The people knew that- so why leave when they knew they had a place to go, that would not cost them any money? BEFORE the storm, Mayor Nagin took numerous city buses around to the projects and other neighborhoods and asked if anyone wanted to leave to hop on the bus. NOBODY LEFT. SO it is their own faults for being stuck there!

    Everyone knew the levees were designed many years ago for only a category 3 hurricane. Katrina was a category 5 right before it hit. But “it will never happen to us” was OUR mentality. I know I live here! Right before Katrina hit, stores were still open, people still out running around, trying to go watch a movie (the theaters had closed) because it is how things go down here. A category 1 hurricane is like a thunderstorm to people down here. A category two is like a severe thunderstorm, so people stay in and have “hurricane parties” a Cat. 3 people take notice but stick around.

    Had it not been for someone giving me money to pay for gas, I would have stayed.

    Race had nothing to do with the response. Until the Levees broke, noone batted an eye. Suddenly the levees broke and everyone was left going “you do it, no you do it, no you do it!!!” As soon as the levees broke, all branches of the govt. from local to state to federal levels, nobody wanted to be stuck holding the blame. So while people suffered, they were trying to figure out how to avoid being stuck holding the hot potato.

    Race had nothing to do with it.. The govts covering their own butts is what had to do with it.

    The New Orleans Mayor is African American, as is most of the counsel, as is most of the school board, etc. Do you REALLY think that they would do this to their own people???

    Get real– take the race out of it and look at the facts, the timelines, etc. and you will see it was a matter of the govt wanting to protect themselves from taking blame, so while they bantered the “hot potato” around, people suffered and lost lives.

    Now, I write this, as I prepare another microwavable meal (I have no kitchen to cook in) and get ready to wash my luch dishes in my bathroom sink upstairs. Remember- I lost absolutely everything downstairs. But I am blessed- I still have a bed and a bedroom (that is all that is left- two bedrooms and a bathroom).

    It is the post Katrina world.


  14. The South's OK (unregistered) on December 27th, 2005 @ 12:28 am

    To the Katrina Survivor you make some very valid and poignant points. I definitely cannot refute what you say, nor your own personal experience. I have expressed to others many of your points- especially the tempting of fate with not evacuting each and every time a warning is made. Like you say, racism does exist. How we deal with it is another issue entirely.

    I only ask that you do not totally dismiss the notion that racism or class played no possible role in the reactive measures and the on-going process to rebuild the city. Statements made by federal officials at FEMA et al in stating that the gov’t was ill-prepared or had no action plan was blatantly false. They had a 200 page documentation plan of action for such a catastrophy. Several Naval vessels could have been made available both near the Port of New Orleans and in the Houston Ship Channel much sooner. Some of these issues were lightly touched in the media, but the media does have its own agenda. It can both use the “race issue” as well as downplay it whenever it wants to. So it comes down to the individual to decipher what is plausible and what’s not.

    I don’t believe that the gov’t necessarily said, “let’s not help this black majority city” but its action post-hurricane speaks otherwise in different ways. The example of the Tuskegee Experiment was just to highlight the fact that how vile our very own gov’t has acted in the recent past. So, I think it is plausible nonetheless that race and class does play an important (not sole) role in the recovery of the city.

    Accountability and responsibility, there is plenty of blame to go around. From the individual all the way up to the federal level. That cannot be refuted. A fundamental change in how FEMA responds to crisis is big, as I was worked for FEMA for my then employer in NYC just after 9/11. But to just say that racism has no involvement is a little naive in my opinion. Work that is going to contractors (the Bechtels of the world), who and how payment is being made to cleanup crews speaks volumes of race and class. Not in every single instance, but more than enough to show that the good ole’ boy network is still in play. People in power never give up power easily.

    Do remember as I did not mention earlier that well-educated blacks were willing participants in this disservice to their people in the Tuskegee Experiment. That is why this so-called scientific research is called Tuskegee because it was executed on the grounds of the Tuskegee Institute (HBCU). The blacks who were doctors and nurses were looking for a name, fame, wealth, or prestige at the expense of other blacks.

    My whole point in bringing up the situation with Katrina is that it plays upon the issues of race and class that are problematic in this country. Also my broader discussion hightlighted the fact that, globally these are very real concerns. Globalization has not produced its promised return to the masses in most countries that have opened up their home markets.

    Beyond New Orleans is the world of poor white trash as some white colleagues would say. In LA, AL, and MS a lot of working-class whites live there. Their pay like everyone else in the region is generally lowest in the country. I know from the union workers over the years in shipping, construction, welding, ironwork that the Gulf Coast made the least (the NE, the West Coast, the SE, and the Gulf coast — from best to worst). The financial aide package that Bush has put together is heavily incentivized for businesses to come to the region. But the educational base is not where it needs to be for this to have an immedimate impact over the next 3-8 years. There is little help to people and businesses (small) in the region already that do not have capital or the ability to access large amounts of capital.

    In living and creating the dream of Dr. King, most people fail greatly as you say. His meeting with sanitation workers was to bring the plight of working-class whites into our struggle as this would be our own once real acceptance was achieved. For me, the Civil Rights movement was able to give a death-blow to overt forms of racism and discrimination. However, clandestic or covert racism as it has been interwoven into typical American society over 400 years has not been defeated. It does not come in the forms of easy to recognize forms such as Jim Crow or “Whites only” signage. And that’s the much harder fight.


  15. Bibbity Bobbity (unregistered) on December 27th, 2005 @ 1:16 pm

    To Lajuana and The South’s OK:

    Perhaps the racist people in LA and NYC were turned that way by living in the South for a few years? I know it’s worn on me!

    La Juana:
    LA can be dirty… just like any major city. But if you go to the nice places (I guess the ones you say are for rich white people) it’s really nice. If nice people and things make you uncomfortable then feel free to stay in the dirty parts. (By the way there are a lot of rich other-than-white-people in LA too. I guess you were stereotyping there?) LaJuana, there are too many places in LA County for you to make comments like this. You need to be more specific. Compton versus Beverly Hills? Bel Aire versus Hollywood? Where are you going with this? If you grew up in Fayetteville, then I think you would be more comfortable in Pasadena…

    About Prop 209… It seems like Atlanta is right behind California on this one. Just ask residents about all of the Mexicans on Roswell Rd and at the local Home Depot. (By the way, I AM Mexican.)

    **Sigh** Overall, a bad song. A bad representation of the city. A racial representation of the city. That’s too bad!!!


  16. Jellocat (unregistered) on December 28th, 2005 @ 10:03 am

    So… what corporation owns Atlanta? Coke? Phillips? This song basically screams CORPORATE TAKE-OVER to me. If they wanted a “song” about the city, they only need look at the incredible multitude of artists that have risen from its red clay – R.E.M. to Outkast to Little Richard to Collective Soul – why didn’t they pull from ANY of those resources? Instead, what did we get in return? God, it sounds worse than most of the American Idol crap that gets poured onto the airwaves. Besides, a song and “branding” campaign don’t sell a city – it’s heart and soul do and I definitely don’t hear either of those two things in this piece of crap.


  17. C.D. (unregistered) on January 9th, 2006 @ 6:04 pm

    OK FIRST AND FOREMOST BLACK AND WHITE MOST OF YOU ON THIS MESSAGE BOARD SOUND VERY RACIST. PERSONALLY I DONT THINK THE SONG IS THAT BAD BECAUSE I LIKE R&B BUT ITS UNDERSTANDABLE THAT OTHER PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT MUSICAL TASTE RATHER YOU ARE BLACK OR WHITE WOULD WANT TO BE REPRESENTED IN A SONG THAT IS SUPPOSE TO REPRESENT THE WHOLE CITY. ALSO FOR ALOT OF YOU PEOPLE WHO KEEP SAYING RAP THIS IS NOT A RAP SONG… LUDACRIS RAPS, OUTKAST RAPS, JAYZ RAPS, THIS IS R&B ALL SINGING NO RAPPING… ALSO TO THE COMMENT ABOUT RAP REFLECTING VIOLENCE OR ETC MAYBE IT DOES AND NOT SAYING ITS RIGHT BUT ALOT OTHER GENRES OF MUSIC DO ALSO LIKE COUNTRY, AND DEF ROCK WHERE THERE IS EVEN SUCH THINGS AS DEVIL WORSHIP. BUT ONCE AGAIN THIS IS NOT A RAP SONG ANYWAY. ALSO IF SOME OF YOU WOULD HAVE DID YOUR RESEARCH YOU WOULD KNOW IT WAS SUPPOSE TO BE MORE DIVERSE BUT ALOT OF ARTIST COULDNT BE REACHED AND DALLAS USED HIS FRIENDS, WHICH BEING A BLACK PERSON AND MOSTLY WORKING WITH R&B ARTIST, THESE ARE THE PEOPLE WHO WERE AVAILABLE… BEING A BLACK PERSON MYSELF I DO THINK THE COMMENT THAT ATLANTA IS A BLACK CITY OR ETC WERE SOMEWHAT RACIST ALSO IT WORKS BOTH WAYS…ALTHOUGH ATL IS MAJORITY BLACK WHICH ALOT OF OTHER PEOPLE FAIL TO REALIZE ITS STILL WRONG TO CLAIM A CITY AS BLACK OR WHITE…BUT TO ALOT OF YOU THAT DONT LIKE THE SONG RATHER YOU AGREE OR NOT ATL HAVE GAINED GREAT POP MUSICLY SINCE ALOT OF R&B AND RAP ARTIST HAVE BEING REPPING THE CITY YOU DONT SEE MANY OTHER GENRES DOING THAT ATLEAST NOT AT FIRST SO MAYBE THATS ANOTHER REASON IT WENT IN THIS DIRECTION…BUT I KNOW THERE ARE OTHER GREAT ARTIST FROM OTHER GENRES FROM ATL WHICH SHOULD HAVE BEEN INCLUDED


  18. Concerned Citizen (unregistered) on February 8th, 2006 @ 12:27 am

    Who cares what genre of music the song is. The point is not that the song is rock, r&b, rap or whatever. The point is what the song represents; specifically what the mayor has decided what should represent our city.
    This is a great city. The Fox, Atlanta Symphony, the High and the Arts Center, Major and minor league sports teams, a budding rap scene, a new aquarium, a storied history, great parks, georgia tech, georgia state, emory, morehouse, and other schools, great research hospitals, (the olympics were here!), and the list goes on and on
    The song the mayor chose to portray our city represents none of these things. The way I see it the mayor is chosing to portray Atlanta a city that has nothing more to offer than a young hip hop culture. “There’s no place I’d rather be” the song says. Well shouldn’t you tell them why Sherly?
    -Jon, a student at Georgia Tech



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